Sessions

 

Sessions

Plenary I

Monday 3 April
8:45am - 9:10am 

Plenary II

Tuesday 4 April
8:30am - 9:30am

Keynote I: Navigating the pipeline

Wednesday 5 April
9:00am - 10:00am

The drug development pipeline is a treacherous pathway to navigate. This session will examine case studies of successes and failures in the pipeline, and include an examination of the challenges faced when reaching the clinical trial stage of development.

  • Professor John Rex, M.D. Vice President and Head of Infection, Global Medicines Development, AstraZeneca
Keynote II

Monday 3 April
10:40am - 11:10am

Session 1: Antimicrobial resistance

Monday 3  April 
11:10am - 12:10pm

Chair: Professor Matthew Cooper

Why have we reached the precipice of a post-antibiotic world? Antimicrobial resistance is an issue with any drug therapy, but what has led to our current predicament? This session will set the scene for the remainder of the conference, focused on solutions, by examining aspects of how infections are monitored.

Session 2: Antimicrobial drug discovery I

Monday 3  April
1:10pm - 3:30pm

Chair: Dr Mark Blaskovich

New antibiotics are desperately needed to treat drug-resistant bacterial infections – with novel chemotypes acting on novel targets a rare commodity. This session will examine early discovery research that could lead to the first next new class of antibiotics in decades.

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Session 3: Improvements to existing anti-infective agents and repurposing drugs

Monday 3  April 
4:30pm - 6:10pm
Chair: Professor Jian Li

The arms race between the development of new anti-infective agents and rise of resistance has been a stalemate for the past 60 years largely due to the development of new generations of existing antibiotics. This session will examine what further improvements are in the pipeline, and the complementary approach of repurposing medications approved for one indication to target a different pathogen.

  • Professor Helen Zgurskaya, University of Oklahoma
  • Dr Tony Velkov, Monash University
  • Dr Kade Roberts, Li Lab, Monash University
  • Angie M Jarrad, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland
  • Michael J Kelso, School of Chemistry, University of Wollongong
Session 4: International models and funding

Tuesday 4 April
9:30am - 10:30am & 11:00am - 12:00pm

Chair: Professor Jian Li

Ambitious collaborative actions are urgently required internationally for combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This unique session will highlight the research agendas of a range of key agencies involved in antimicrobial resistance research, including the new CARB-X global antibacterial innovation initiative, the NIH/NIAID, the European Commission, the Wellcome Trust and the NHMRC. The speakers will discuss strategies and funding models responding to the most pressing problems due to antimicrobial resistance, with a session goal of providing access to future points of interaction with these major funding bodies for grant opportunities..

Session 5: Antimicrobial drug discovery II

Tuesday 4 April
1:00 pm - 3:15pm
Chair: Professor Matthew Cooper

New antibiotics are desperately needed to treat drug-resistant bacterial infections – with novel chemotypes acting on novel targets a rare commodity. This session will examine early discovery research that could lead to the first next new class of antibiotics in decades.

Session 6: Alternate therapies

Tuesday 4 April
3:45pm - 5:40pm

Chair: Professor Elizabeth Harry

Antibiotics are not the only approach to treating infections, and the rise of resistance has led to a renewed focus on alternate therapies, including antibody-based therapeutics, stimulation of the immune response, probiotic approaches to alter the microbiome, phage therapy, and other treatments. This session will examine a number of these, and their potential to help overcome the threat posed by AMR infections.

Session 7: New drug targets

Wednesday 5 April 
10:30am - 12:00pm

Chair: Professor Vicky Avery

In order to rationally develop novel antimicrobials, new drug targets specific for the pathogen of interest must first be identified. While this approach has shown limited success in the past, a number of new promising targets have been identified in recent years.

Session 8: Vector control and vaccines

Wednesday 5 April
1:00pm - 2:30pm

Chair: Professor Paul Young

Prevention is a key strategy to reducing drug-resistant infections. Reducing the carriers of pathogens via vector control, or preventing infections by using vaccine, can be strikingly effective at reducing the number of cases requiring antimicrobial therapy. This session will assess several different approaches.

Session 9: Panel - top 3 priorities to guide AMR research

Wednesday 5 April 
3:30pm - 4:30pm

Moderator: Mr Jason Gale, Bloomberg News

Panel:


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